Eyeball licking (oculolinctus) warning would be a hoax

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Eyeball-licking fetishism, also referred to as “oculolinctus” or “worming”, was considered to be a well known method of expressing affection or inciting full sexual confidence in Japan. Rumors started circulating that doctors were warning of significant perils of virus conjunctivitis, other eye infections, as well as blindness

Based on the Japanese website Naver Matome, the oculolinctus craze in the united states among youthful enthusiasts had led to a substantial rise in eye-infection cases.

It had been stated that Naver Matome had selected up reports claiming a Japanese school had observed children entering class putting on eye patches, with reports of twelve-year-old children in the school participating in “oculolinctus”.

The British newspaper The Protector reported the oculolinctus trend being inspired with a Japanese emo band “Born” inside a music video.

Update, August ninth, 2013

Reports of the outbreak of eye infections among Japanese schoolchildren which had become associated with a so-known as eyeball-licking fetish have been false. Based on Mark Schreiber, in the Japan Occasions, it had been a hoax.

Schreiber made contact with with two ophthalmological organizations in Japan, a college professor, as well as an organization representing school doctors. He requested them concerning the alleged eyeball licking occurrences and eye illnesses.

Within an article inside a trade publication to foreign correspondents, No. 1 Shimbun, Schreiber authored “Not one of them had the faintest concept of things i was speaking about. None understood anything concerning the rampant spread of disease.”

Nearly all journalists in the united states and United kingdom selected in the story from Shanghaiist, that has online translations of Asian journal articles in British.

Based on Schreiber, the storyline originated in Bucchi News, a subculture enthusiasts’ site. Schreiber added that Bucchi News includes a dubious status for precision.

Several western newspapers authored concerning the eyeball licking craze in Japanese schools, such as the Huffington Publish, The Protector, CBS News, The Telegraph, and also the Daily Caller.